We the People; President Obama’s 2nd Inaugural Address

Invite 002As an ardent and unapologetic Obama supporter, I found his 2nd inaugural celebration inclusive and inspiring, the recognition of a genuinely good person whose interest is in securing economic and social justice for we the people, so that we might, as a nation, live up to and perpetuate our founding fathers’ ideals. The president’s deeply moving inaugural address reflected this with thoughtful and uplifting words. Here are some highlights:

“Each time we gather to inaugurate a President we bear witness to the enduring strength of our Constitution. We affirm the promise of our democracy. We recall that what binds this nation together is not the colors of our skin or the tenets of our faith or the origins of our names. What makes us exceptional is our allegiance to an idea articulated in a declaration made more than two centuries ago: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.’

Today we continue a never-ending journey to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time. For history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident, they’ve never been self-executing; that while freedom is a gift from God, it must be secured by His people here on Earth. The patriots of 1776 did not fight to replace the tyranny of a king with the privileges of a few or the rule of a mob. They gave us a republic of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed.”

“But we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action . . . . Now more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people . . . . My fellow Americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it — so long as we seize it together.”

“Being true to our fouinding documents does not require us to agree on every contour of life. It does not mean we all define liberty in exactly the same way or follow the same precise path to happiness. Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time. But it does require us to act in our time.”

“You and I, as citizens, have the power to set this country’s course. You and I, as citizens, have the obligation to shape the debates of our time — not only with the votes we cast, but with the voices we lift in defense of our most ancient values and enduring ideals.”

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  • Copyright © 2011-16, Dianne Ebertt Beeaff. All Rights Reserved.
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